How many injections prevent one covid death?

Risk is notoriously difficult to communicate effectively. It is especially hard when referring to an emotive subject like the risk of dying as the emotional response prevents rational interpretation of complex numbers. To simplify understanding of the benefits of interventions the number of people who need to be treated to prevent a death can be measured, the number needed to treat (or “NNT”). The same

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The ONS Infection Survey: a re-evaluation of the data

Whether this is Omicron or cross reactivity with previously endemic coronaviruses is uncertain. What is clear from the Ct values in the ONS Infection Survey is that neither “non-pharmaceutical interventions” or vaccines have had any impact on waves of infectious SARS-CoV-2 carriers and that neither economically destructive lockdowns or mandating experimental vaccines should ever have been attempted.

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Rise in long-term sickness

The ONS have published their survey data on the number of working aged people who are economically inactive. The levels are higher than in the past and many commentators were quick to blame the rise on long covid. It is worth looking a little more closely before jumping to that conclusion.

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Data shenanigans as Sweden misleads its public over vaccination-related mortality data

In December 2021 Norman Fenton, Martin Neil, Clare Craig, Josh Geutzkow, Joel Smalley, Scott McLachlan and Jonathan Engler published an article casting doubt on the vaccine efficacy implied by the UK’s official mortality statistics as they related to vaccination status, raising miscategorisation of vaccinated deaths soon after injection as unvaccinated as a possible significant factor.

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Covid-19 : the Evidence Now

It is over two years since the first lockdown and now more than a year since HART published its paper COVID-19: an overview of the evidence. We asked all the original authors to go back and review their article and update with relevant publications, revising their conclusions as appropriate.

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